The Changing Landscape of Poverty

SAVI Talks - June 2019

The poverty rate in Central Indiana has risen from 9% in 1970 to 14% in 2017, but the rates vary widely by neighborhood. How is poverty changing at the local level? Who is most affected by these changes?

Historically, poverty has been highest in core urban neighborhoods where, in 1970, one in six residents lived in poverty. Now that number is one in three. Poverty has grown the fastest in middle-ring suburbs where the rate has quadrupled from 5% in 1970 to 20% in 2017. Meanwhile, some neighborhoods, such as those built since 2000, have had consistently low rates of poverty and have experienced very little change in those rates.

The residents in each of these areas are different, and so is their experience of living in poverty. What challenges are unique to the very low income families in neighborhoods where poverty is high or climbing quickly?

Join us June 27 as we explore these findings and the implications for people living below the poverty line in different parts of the region.

SAVI Talks: The Changing Landscape of Poverty

  • When: June 27, 8am
  • Where: WFYI Community Room, 1630 N. Meridian St., Indianapolis

Poverty in Indy Region and Our Peers

This map represents colored by when they were built, from before 1940 to since 2000. By examining when housing units were built, we divide the region into development bands, or eras of development. Then we examine how poverty has shifted in those areas sine 1970.

Community Trends Report

This research report will be released at our SAVI Talks event, June 6 at WFYI. Register here: http://go.iu.edu/2an2.

Articles and Story Maps

Explore interactive content built on our neighborhood change research.

Increasing Mortgage Values

Increasing Mortgage Values

Mortgage values are increasing across the county, indicating an increase in housing prices. We explore the fastest changing areas, as well as places with very little little mortgage activity.

Indy’s Poverty Increased over 50 Years, What about Peers?

Indy’s Poverty Increased over 50 Years, What about Peers?

The Indy region's poverty rate increased over the past 50 years, mostly between 2000 and 2010. We looked at peer cities from Cincinnati to Austin to see if they experienced similar trends.

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

Christian Park was subdivided in the 1920s, but mostly built after World War II. Once an all-white neighborhood with high home ownership, the area has become part of a Latino community on the southeast side, and home ownership has fallen.

Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Using the age of housing stock in each neighborhood, we have created "development bands," which group areas by the time period in which they were primarily built.

Children Transfer Often at Charter Schools, Low-Income Schools

Children Transfer Often at Charter Schools, Low-Income Schools

When a student changes schools often, it can impact education outcomes. Charter schools tend to have the highest transfer rates, and a school's share of students from low-income families has a strong relationship to transfer rates.

Indy Neighborhoods with Fastest Changing Income Diversity

Indy Neighborhoods with Fastest Changing Income Diversity

Most neighborhoods became more mixed-income between 2011 and 2016. Farley, near Ben Davis, had the biggest increase in income diversity, while the historically black suburb Grandview had the biggest decrease.

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Explore neighborhoods where residents are highly concentrated into a few income groups. We dive into examples of concentrations of low-income residents, high-income residents, and middle-income residents.

Estimated 200,000 Indy Residents Live in Food Deserts

Estimated 200,000 Indy Residents Live in Food Deserts

Using recent, local data to improve on food access measures, we find that an estimated 200,000 Indianapolis residents have low food access and live in low income areas.

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

We measured income diversity in every neighborhood in the region, and the most mixed-income neighborhoods include the Old Northside, the tract containing Rocky Ripple and Crows Nest, and the area near Pike High School.

What Can the Opportunity Atlas Tell Us About Indianapolis?

What Can the Opportunity Atlas Tell Us About Indianapolis?

The newly released Opportunity Atlas shows that children born in different neighborhoods can have vastly different outcomes. Children born in Indianapolis urban core have lower household incomes than those born in northern suburbs.

Authors

Kelly Davila,
Senior Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Matt Nowlin,
Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Unai Miquel Andres,
GIS and Data Analyst,
The Polis Center

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