Where Schools Are Changing: Regional and Neighborhood Dynamics from 2010 to 2016

SAVI Talks - November 2018
Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates. Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.

Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Explore Changing Schools

Map the region’s schools or find statistics about your neighborhood school.

Community Trends Report

Families often choose where to live based on neighborhood characteristics, especially the quality and reputation of nearby schools. But we live in a highly mobile society, in a rapidly changing region, and many of Central Indiana’s neighborhoods have seen significant change in their residents and their schools.

We used state-reported data from the 2009-2010 and 2015-2016 academic years to interpret these trends in the Indianapolis region. We performed analyses from three perspectives, 1) finding demographic changes at the school level that are indicative of neighborhood changes, 2) viewing regional trends that cut across district lines, and 3) analyzing the spatial characteristics of school change.

Key findings from this report include:

  • Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates.
  • Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.
  • Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Articles and Story Maps

Explore interactive content built on our neighborhood change research.

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Three Ways to Visualize COVID-19 Race and Gender Disparities

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Candidate’s Housing Proposal Calls Attention to How We Measure Vacancy Rates

Candidate’s Housing Proposal Calls Attention to How We Measure Vacancy Rates

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Increasing Mortgage Values

Increasing Mortgage Values

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Indy’s Poverty Increased over 50 Years, What about Peers?

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The Indy region's poverty rate increased over the past 50 years, mostly between 2000 and 2010. We looked at peer cities from Cincinnati to Austin to see if they experienced similar trends.

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

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Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Using the age of housing stock in each neighborhood, we have created "development bands," which group areas by the time period in which they were primarily built.

Authors

Kelly Davila,
Senior Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Matt Nowlin,
Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Unai Miquel Andres,
GIS and Data Analyst,
The Polis Center

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