Where Schools Are Changing: Regional and Neighborhood Dynamics from 2010 to 2016

SAVI Talks - November 2018
Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates. Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.

Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Explore Changing Schools

Map the region’s schools or find statistics about your neighborhood school.

Community Trends Report

Families often choose where to live based on neighborhood characteristics, especially the quality and reputation of nearby schools. But we live in a highly mobile society, in a rapidly changing region, and many of Central Indiana’s neighborhoods have seen significant change in their residents and their schools.

We used state-reported data from the 2009-2010 and 2015-2016 academic years to interpret these trends in the Indianapolis region. We performed analyses from three perspectives, 1) finding demographic changes at the school level that are indicative of neighborhood changes, 2) viewing regional trends that cut across district lines, and 3) analyzing the spatial characteristics of school change.

Key findings from this report include:

  • Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates.
  • Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.
  • Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Articles and Story Maps

Explore interactive content built on our neighborhood change research.

Indy’s Poverty Increased over 50 Years, What about Peers?

Indy’s Poverty Increased over 50 Years, What about Peers?

The Indy region's poverty rate increased over the past 50 years, mostly between 2000 and 2010. We looked at peer cities from Cincinnati to Austin to see if they experienced similar trends.

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

In Christian Park, a Postwar Neighborhood Experiences 21st Century Changes

Christian Park was subdivided in the 1920s, but mostly built after World War II. Once an all-white neighborhood with high home ownership, the area has become part of a Latino community on the southeast side, and home ownership has fallen.

Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Mapping Bands of Urban and Suburban Development

Using the age of housing stock in each neighborhood, we have created "development bands," which group areas by the time period in which they were primarily built.

Children Transfer Often at Charter Schools, Low-Income Schools

Children Transfer Often at Charter Schools, Low-Income Schools

When a student changes schools often, it can impact education outcomes. Charter schools tend to have the highest transfer rates, and a school's share of students from low-income families has a strong relationship to transfer rates.

Indy Neighborhoods with Fastest Changing Income Diversity

Indy Neighborhoods with Fastest Changing Income Diversity

Most neighborhoods became more mixed-income between 2011 and 2016. Farley, near Ben Davis, had the biggest increase in income diversity, while the historically black suburb Grandview had the biggest decrease.

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Explore neighborhoods where residents are highly concentrated into a few income groups. We dive into examples of concentrations of low-income residents, high-income residents, and middle-income residents.

Estimated 200,000 Indy Residents Live in Food Deserts

Estimated 200,000 Indy Residents Live in Food Deserts

Using recent, local data to improve on food access measures, we find that an estimated 200,000 Indianapolis residents have low food access and live in low income areas.

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

We measured income diversity in every neighborhood in the region, and the most mixed-income neighborhoods include the Old Northside, the tract containing Rocky Ripple and Crows Nest, and the area near Pike High School.

What Can the Opportunity Atlas Tell Us About Indianapolis?

What Can the Opportunity Atlas Tell Us About Indianapolis?

The newly released Opportunity Atlas shows that children born in different neighborhoods can have vastly different outcomes. Children born in Indianapolis urban core have lower household incomes than those born in northern suburbs.

In Neighborhoods North of Speedway, Diversity Among Highest in Indy

In Neighborhoods North of Speedway, Diversity Among Highest in Indy

Though they developed as all-white suburbs between 1940 and 1970, the neighborhoods near the Indianapolis Motor Speedway are some of the densest and most diverse in Indianapolis.

Authors

Kelly Davila,
Senior Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Matt Nowlin,
Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Unai Miquel Andres,
GIS and Data Analyst,
The Polis Center

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