Where Schools Are Changing: Regional and Neighborhood Dynamics from 2010 to 2016

SAVI Talks - November 2018
Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates. Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.

Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Explore Changing Schools

Map the region’s schools or find statistics about your neighborhood school.

Community Trends Report

Families often choose where to live based on neighborhood characteristics, especially the quality and reputation of nearby schools. But we live in a highly mobile society, in a rapidly changing region, and many of Central Indiana’s neighborhoods have seen significant change in their residents and their schools.

We used state-reported data from the 2009-2010 and 2015-2016 academic years to interpret these trends in the Indianapolis region. We performed analyses from three perspectives, 1) finding demographic changes at the school level that are indicative of neighborhood changes, 2) viewing regional trends that cut across district lines, and 3) analyzing the spatial characteristics of school change.

Key findings from this report include:

  • Regionally, schools are becoming more racially diverse, have a growing share of low-income students, and have increasing graduation rates.
  • Low-income student population is falling in central Indianapolis and growing in Marion County’s townships, pointing to a growing number of low-income families living in first-ring suburbs.
  • Schools experiencing similar change tend to be grouped geographically, with rapidly changing schools in more urban areas, and those holding steady in racial and income change located in more suburban and rural areas.

Articles and Story Maps

Explore interactive content built on our neighborhood change research.

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Least Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Explore neighborhoods where residents are highly concentrated into a few income groups. We dive into examples of concentrations of low-income residents, high-income residents, and middle-income residents.

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

Indy’s Most Mixed-Income Neighborhoods

We measured income diversity in every neighborhood in the region, and the most mixed-income neighborhoods include the Old Northside, the tract containing Rocky Ripple and Crows Nest, and the area near Pike High School.

In Neighborhoods North of Speedway, Diversity Among Highest in Indy

In Neighborhoods North of Speedway, Diversity Among Highest in Indy

Though they developed as all-white suburbs between 1940 and 1970, the neighborhoods near the Indianapolis Motor Speedway are some of the densest and most diverse in Indianapolis.

The Growing Divide Between Rich and Poor Neighborhoods

The Growing Divide Between Rich and Poor Neighborhoods

In 1970, there was a $22.6k gap between average family income in high- and low-income (80th and 20th percentile) neighborhoods. By 2016, the gap had doubled to $53.5k. Incomes grew for wealthy and middle-income neighborhoods, but fell for low-income neighborhoods.

After Public Investment, St. Clair Place’s Housing Market Significantly Stronger

After Public Investment, St. Clair Place’s Housing Market Significantly Stronger

Mortgage activity in St. Clair Place shows a dramatic increase in home purchases and home value since 2007. The area is more diverse than ever and poverty is falling for people of color. But home buyers are still 76 percent white.

In Little Flower, More College Graduates, Young Adults, but Incomes are Falling

In Little Flower, More College Graduates, Young Adults, but Incomes are Falling

There's a shrinking share of people in their 20s in this German/Irish neighborhood, but a growing of share in their 30s and 40s, as well as a growing population of children. These residents are less likely to live in poverty than other age groups, but they have still seen ...

Income Inequality High Where Golden Hill and Northwest Indianapolis Converge

Income Inequality High Where Golden Hill and Northwest Indianapolis Converge

In the area where wealthy Golden Hills converges with the working-class neighborhoods of Northwest Indianapolis, income inequality is high and increasing. The area is also experiencing a growth of white households above the median income.

Changes in Indy’s Historic Black Neighborhoods

Changes in Indy’s Historic Black Neighborhoods

In the 1970s, 4,000 residents left this nearly all-black neighborhood. Why? An increasingly desegregated housing market and closure of one of the country’s first public housing projects.

Story Map: Moving Out – Suburbanization Since 1970

Story Map: Moving Out – Suburbanization Since 1970

Indianapolis and Anderson were the region's urban centers in 1970. Three-quarters of the population lived in those counties. Now, just over half the population live there, and Hamilton County is the second largest urban center.

Story Map: Race and Migration Since 1970

Story Map: Race and Migration Since 1970

In 1970, half of the region's Black population lived in 12 square miles north of downtown Indianapolis. As Black residents moved into '60s suburban communities, 120,000 White residents left the city's core for newer suburbs.

Authors

Kelly Davila,
Senior Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Matt Nowlin,
Research Analyst,
The Polis Center

Unai Miquel Andres,
GIS and Data Analyst,
The Polis Center

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